Legal help for data breach compensation claims

Government data leaks

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Anyone who has been affected by government data leaks can be entitled to make a claim for compensation, and we may be able to offer No Win, No Fee representation.

Despite certain events that take place, the government is not above the law and can be held to account. When it comes to important data protection legislation, they must abide by the GDPR and the other laws that are in place to safeguard information that is stored and processed. Where data is leaked, victims could be entitled to claim, and we may be able to assist.

Don’t be afraid that you may need to take on the government in a case. As a leading firm of consumer action and data breach compensation lawyers, we’ll fight your corner. We’re used to taking on governments as well as some of the biggest corporations, insurers and defence law firms in the world. You have rights, and we can fight for them for you.

Compensation for government data leaks

Victims of government data leaks can be entitled to make a claim for compensation. You could be entitled to receive damages for the distress caused by the loss of control of your personal information. You may also be able to recover amounts for losses and expenses if those also apply.

Data breach compensation settlement amounts can be solely based on the distress alone. You don’t have to have suffered financial losses, which is important to remember.

If we believe that we can win the case you bring to us, we can offer to represent you for the claim on a No Win, No Fee basis. This may apply where we believe that we can establish a case of negligence against the government or the agency responsible for the leak. They have a duty to safeguard the information that they process and store in the same way private companies do.

You may have a valid case where:

  • Data has been leaked by accident, often referred to as “human error” incidents. It could be that information has been sent to the wrong person or has been published online by accident;
  • Data that should be secure has been left exposed due to a lack of security or encryption, which can also stem from “human error”;
  • Information being shared without your clear and informed consent;
  • Data leaked following information being compromised in a cyberattack.

Simple leaks can cause big problems

The worry of government data leaks taking place during the coronavirus pandemic and the lockdown measures that have been enforced is heightened. With many people working remotely, there are clear opportunities for hackers to exploit, and we know that cybercriminals have been taking advantage of the current situation. A such, there needs to be a focus on making sure that data is not left vulnerable due to the changes that we have had to make so we can avoid people with malicious intentions getting hold of private and sensitive information.

Sometimes, it can be the simplest of things as well. There was a recent example at the end of April where the House of Lords was having issues with their live broadcast proceedings. It’s understood that, when some peers entered or exited the virtual Microsoft Teams room, their mobile telephone number was being read out.

Imagine that someone with malicious intentions hears that live on television and decides to use it to their advantage. A simple leak that stemmed from no real comprehension that it might even happen. It really highlights the increased vulnerabilities that have resulted from the lockdown and the greater reliance on technology to continue our society functioning.

What you need to do

You can speak to the team for free, no-obligation advice about government data leaks.

All you need to do is go to our contact page here to see the various ways you can get in touch.

We can normally let you know right away if the case is one that we can take forward. If we agree to take it on, we can offer No Win, No Fee arrangements.

IMPORTANT: advice on this page is intended to be up-to-date for the 'first published date'.

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Your privacy is extremely important to us. Information on how we handle your data is in our Privacy Policy.
You have the right to object to the processing of your personal data.

First published by Matthew on May 27, 2020
Posted in the following categories: Claims Cybersecurity Data GDPR Government Scammers Security Technology and tagged with | | | | | | |


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