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Typeform data breach claim

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In June 2018, it was revealed that survey company Typeform had suffered a data breach. The company reportedly became aware of the issue on 27th June, identifying that an attack had led to hackers downloading what was described to be a “partial backup” of its customer data. When we learned of the breach, we offered advice to those affected, and victims may still be able to make a Typeform data breach claim as part of the action that we are pursuing.

In accordance with UK data protection law, all those who disclose their information to third parties have a right to the protection of their personal information. Typeform’s customers, therefore, justifiably expected that they could trust Typeform with their data. Unfortunately, instead, some were greeted with the news that their information had been exposed.

As leading specialists in data breach claims, Your Lawyers (t/a The Data Leak Lawyers) helps those affected by data exposure to claim the compensation that they deserve. Although three years have passed since the Typeform data breach was revealed, more victims may still have a chance to make a claim, so contact our team for more advice if you were affected. We are already helping others on a No Win, No Fee basis.

The effects of the Typeform data breach

As a company offering survey and quiz services, Typeform collects swathes of data from its clients. These clients are businesses that make use of Typeform to conduct their customer surveys, a fact which meant that the impact of the breach could be wide-reaching. It also meant that companies affected by the incident needed to contact their own customers regarding the potential exposure of their information as well.

Monzo, the online bank, suspected that the data of some of its customers had been affected, and reported that the affected information was likely to include email addresses, Twitter usernames and postcodes. Typeform itself told customers that any results collected before 3rd May 2018 may have been compromised but did assert that no payment data or account passwords had been affected.

Making a Typeform data breach claim

If you were affected by the breach, you may have been contacted by Typeform directly, or by one of the customers or partners of Typeform. If you received a notification message, you may be able to make a Typeform data breach claim.

In your Typeform data breach claim, you could be eligible to recover compensation for any distress you suffered as a result of the breach, or for any financial losses that may have been caused. For example, those whose email addresses were compromised could have been targeted with phishing scams, which may have resulted in fraud.

Claim with The Data Leak Lawyers

Your Lawyers (t/a The Data Leak Lawyers) have been representing victims for privacy matters since 2014. Our experience in data protection breach claims has led to us key roles on some of the largest data group actions ever seen in England and Wales, including the British Airways Group Litigation Order.

We, therefore, have the expertise needed to represent you for your Typeform data breach claim. If you were affected and want to learn more about claiming, simply contact our team for free, no-obligation advice on your case.

IMPORTANT: advice on this page is intended to be up-to-date for the 'first published date'.

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Your privacy is extremely important to us. Information on how we handle your data is in our Privacy Policy.
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First published by Author on July 13, 2021
Posted in the following categories: Claims Cybersecurity Data Group Action Security and tagged with | | | | | | |


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