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Ticketmaster UK data breach just the tip of the iceberg

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The massive Ticketmaster UK data breach from June appears to be just the tip of the iceberg as part of a wider cyberattack campaign.

According to security researchers, the software that was hacked that led to the Ticketmaster data breach was one of many targeted and successfully hacked as part of a wider campaign to access the payment information for tens of thousands of people at a time across the world. This does not fill anyone who uses online payment platforms with a great deal of confidence, and given the scale of the online industry, how can we know for sure that we’re ever safe?

We’re representing a number of victims of the Ticketmaster UK data breach who are claiming compensation having had their information compromised.

The Ticketmaster UK data breach one of many outlets hit

According to the research, the software that was hacked in the Ticketmaster UK data breach – developed by Inbenta – was just one of many targeted and successfully hacked into.

The list of software potentially compromised in addition to the Inbenta software reportedly includes software from Annex Cloud, CMS Clarity Connect, PushAssist and SociaPlus; and potentially many others.

This means we could be seeing more organisations revealing data breaches as a result of such compromised coding in the coming weeks, months, or even years. We know that some victims of the Ticketmaster data breach should fall directly within the realms of the new GDPR legislation, so they – and perhaps others – may be in line for significant fines.

The Ticketmaster UK data breach was entirely preventable

In our view, the Ticketmaster UK data breach was entirely preventable and that’s why we have agreed to act for a number of victims claiming for data breach compensation as a result of the incident.

The code that was breached in the incident appears to have been compromised for a number of months before it was identified, and Ticketmaster were also warned of a breach back in April, yet they failed to stop it.

They were also reportedly not supposed to be using the InBenta code for the purposes of payment transactions either, with the developers of the software saying that, had they have known, they would have been able to warn Ticketmaster not to use it for such purposes.

Claiming for compensation as a result of the Ticketmaster UK data breach

If you have been affected by the Ticketmaster UK data breach and you would like advice about representation for joining our growing Claimant Group, please contact the team for help and assistance.

IMPORTANT: advice on this page is intended to be up-to-date for the 'first published date'.

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First published by Matthew on August 17, 2018
Posted in the following categories: Cybersecurity Security and tagged with


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